Special Education Observation

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I know I talk a lot about how amazing the education program is, but it is, so I will continue the trend of talking about education because how could anyone even get to college without teachers? Teachers are the driving force of our nation, but I digress. For the education program, students have to get observation hours in different classroom settings for some of the classes, so I did my special education observation this week while on Spring break. I went to a school in Michigan (because that is where I am from) and observed a special education teacher at Lakeview High School. While most people would probably not enjoy going to a high school for fifteen hours during Spring break (not that this is the only time to get observations), it was still a very interesting and educational experience, as I have almost no experience with public schools or special education.

When doing the observations, all I really have to do is follow around the teacher and see what they do every day and observe how they teach their students, studying the tactics and other things they use to be effective supports to their kids. The teacher I observed worked individually with some kids in the mornings who needed help with things, keeps track of the students under her and their progress, holds Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings, and teaches or co-teaches a couple classes. I was lucky enough to be able to sit in on two IEPs in which they meet with the student, parents, and teachers to talk about the plan for their special education and needs. I also got the chance to teach the English class for those who struggle with their language skills. Overall, it gave me a whole new view of special education that I had not understood before, and I give a lot of props to the teachers who do that because they are very dedicated to their students and helping them be successful in their educations.

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